Musical instrument – Michael Dorf http://michaeldorf.org/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 08:40:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://michaeldorf.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/default1.png Musical instrument – Michael Dorf http://michaeldorf.org/ 32 32 Discover Prince’s piano and other treasures in a new exhibit at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix https://michaeldorf.org/discover-princes-piano-and-other-treasures-in-a-new-exhibit-at-the-musical-instrument-museum-in-phoenix/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:34:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/discover-princes-piano-and-other-treasures-in-a-new-exhibit-at-the-musical-instrument-museum-in-phoenix/ The first electric guitar played in public. The first Hawaiian-made ukulele. Eric Clapton’s 1956 Fender Stratocaster, “Brownie”, which helped create his signature sound on classic songs like “Layla” and “Bell Bottom Blues”. All these elements and more than twenty new rare and precious objects will be exhibited from Friday November 11 in the special exhibition […]]]>

The first electric guitar played in public. The first Hawaiian-made ukulele. Eric Clapton’s 1956 Fender Stratocaster, “Brownie”, which helped create his signature sound on classic songs like “Layla” and “Bell Bottom Blues”.

All these elements and more than twenty new rare and precious objects will be exhibited from Friday November 11 in the special exhibition of the Museum of Musical Instruments, Rediscover treasures: legendary musical instruments. Twenty of the original 80 items from the previous iteration that ended in October, titled Treasures: Legendary Musical Instruments, were removed to make room for these 28 pieces.

The objects span time, geography and cultures, and are the “best of the best,” says MIM curator Rich Walter. They are instruments that are “most artfully created, [have] been in the hands of the most important people and used in the most important contexts. He adds: “It’s the objects that really stop us in our tracks when we see them.”

While MIM’s regular collection is impressive, everything about this exhibit is “superlative,” says Walter. “We asked people, ‘What does it mean to be a treasure?’ This sample of responses is interesting… Whimsical and decorative things, things that belonged to chefs and rock stars, things that were hard to find. There are examples of all of this throughout the gallery.

He adds: “Each of them has real energy and gravity around them.”

Some instruments were created thousands of years ago, while others are contemporary, and all reveal exquisite craftsmanship. One of the objects that excites Walter is a Chinese bronze bell that is around 2,500 years old. These objects “help us understand musical traditions around the world, but they are works of art,” he says.

Other objects include one of four surviving examples of an ancient pedal harp, a carved figurative drum from Gabon on the west coast of central Africa, and a 14th-century Japanese emperor’s hitoyogiri flute. Walter says all the instruments are “incredibly well preserved, so you not only get a sense of the history, but the artistic ability, the tastes, the aesthetics, of cultures from around the world.”

Of course, he understands that many people will be excited about the newer pieces, including Clapton’s guitar and items that once belonged to Prince on loan from his home and studio, Paisley Park. The musician’s purple “Beautiful” Yamaha grand piano that he danced to on his 1997-98 Jam of the Year tour and a bright green stage outfit worn on the 1997 tour will be there, along with his electric bass “Black Power”. These items will remain on loan once the exhibition closes in fall 2023.

“They were very generous in loaning three pieces that would represent his career at an interesting time,” says Walter. “A lot of these items don’t travel far from Paisley Park, so having them here in Phoenix is ​​cool for Prince fans.”

Other celebrity instruments added to this exhibit include Dizzy Gillespie’s gold-plated Martin Committee trumpet with its distinctive angled bell and Lionel Hampton’s bespoke Deagan vibraphone.

Some items are firsts, such as the first electric guitar played in public on Halloween weekend, 1932, by bandleader Gage Brewer of Wichita, Kansas, and the first Hawaii-made ukulele, believed to have been made by Portuguese immigrant Jose do Espirito Santo.

How do they know these items have the pedigree they claim to have? Loans like these come from collections of peers who have done their own research or from private collections where people “have devoted their lives to passionate study,” Walter notes.

The notoriety of other instruments has been well documented historically. For example, the 1889 Erard grand piano from the original exhibition – which ran from November 2021 to October 2022 – is one of the most lavish ever built. It was a centerpiece originally shown at the Paris World’s Fair “where the Eiffel Tower was this brand new incredible landmark,” says Walter.

As in the rest of the museum, the instruments of Rediscovered treasures are not static objects sitting on a shelf. Audio and visual context is provided so visitors can actually hear and often see them play.

“You can see on the screens people playing with these rare and historic objects and explaining why they are so important or shedding light on why they have been so carefully preserved over time,” says Walter. “It’s so important to see how the instruments are played and to hear what they sound like.”

He says it’s vital for the museum to be an immersive experience for visitors, adding: ‘We actually hope that by the time they walk through the whole gallery they will have an expanded sense that it’s all extraordinarily special and that they represent the best of their kind for display.

During the opening weekend of November 12-13, MIM will be scheduling talks and demonstrations highlighting the exhibit, so check the schedule at mim.org for a schedule. The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; adult admission is $10 for the special exhibit or $27 to enter both the exhibit and the full collection.

Rediscover treasures: legendary musical instruments. Opens Friday, November 11 and runs through Fall 2023. Musical Instrument Museum, 4725 East Mayo Boulevard. Museum hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. The cost is $10 for the exhibit or $27 for the museum and exhibit. Call 480-478-6000 or visit the Musical Instrument Museum website for tickets, information, and a schedule of exhibit opening weekend programming.

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Auction of Hollywood memorabilia, artwork and musical instruments https://michaeldorf.org/auction-of-hollywood-memorabilia-artwork-and-musical-instruments/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:17:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/auction-of-hollywood-memorabilia-artwork-and-musical-instruments/ Elvis Presley LP guitar Bette Lou Voorhis Kings Auctions Inc. again partners with local real estate sales companies, this time California Estate Sales & Auction Company and Kings Auctions Austin Texas Branch LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, USA, Nov. 8, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Upon request, Kings Auctions Inc. is once again partnering with local real estate sales […]]]>

Elvis Presley LP

guitar

guitar

Bette Lou Voorhis

Bette Lou Voorhis

Kings Auctions Inc. again partners with local real estate sales companies, this time California Estate Sales & Auction Company and Kings Auctions Austin Texas Branch

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, USA, Nov. 8, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Upon request, Kings Auctions Inc. is once again partnering with local real estate sales companies, this time California Estate Sales & Auction Company and Kings Auctions Austin Tx Branch, for an auction of Hollywood memorabilia, artwork and musical instruments.

At auction you will find rare and collectible Elvis Presley albums and rare and collectible prints. The collection includes interviews, live performances, soundtracks, Christmas albums, rare imports and more.

The second part of the auction is a large collection of musical instruments including tubas, trombones, violins, banjos, guitars, saxophones, trumpets, sheet music and miscellaneous. parts and mouthpieces.

And finally, the third installment of the auction is a large collection of Texas and Western art by renowned artist Betty Lou Voorhis. Most are signed originals such as ‘Old Country Path’, ‘Roses In A Basket On A Dock’, ‘Christmas Bear’, ‘Path Leading To A River’, ‘Picking Wild Flowers’, ‘Sail boats on a river’ , ‘Garden Fountain’, and many more, all ready to frame. Some of the other artists represented at the event are William Ballantine Dorsey and Joseph Anizska.

Sign up to be part of this exciting event.

Allie Jones
Kings Auctions Inc.
+1 310-857-8367
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Prince and Clapton’s instruments on display at the Musical Instrument Museum https://michaeldorf.org/prince-and-claptons-instruments-on-display-at-the-musical-instrument-museum/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 20:15:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/prince-and-claptons-instruments-on-display-at-the-musical-instrument-museum/ Instruments Rediscover Treasures: Legendary Musical Instruments opens November 11 Job Friday, October 21, 2022 1:15 p.m. This fall, some of the rarest instruments of their kind will join the Musical Instrument Museum’s special Treasures: Legendary Musical Instruments exhibition – which includes pieces ranging from antique flutes to priceless instruments owned and played by musical icons […]]]>

Instruments

Rediscover Treasures: Legendary Musical Instruments opens November 11

Job

This fall, some of the rarest instruments of their kind will join the Musical Instrument Museum’s special Treasures: Legendary Musical Instruments exhibition – which includes pieces ranging from antique flutes to priceless instruments owned and played by musical icons like Prince and Eric Clapton. .

Since the exhibit opened in November 2021, more than 51,500 guests have explored the exhibit, which celebrates the power of music across 6,000 years of history, according to a press release.

MIM has announced that the exhibit will reopen on November 11 as Rediscovering Treasures: Legendary Musical Instruments, and will feature 28 new acquisitions and loans of historical significance for guests to explore alongside exhibit favorites like the Erard grand piano, the violin and the viola Amati, the ancient Mesopotamian. lyre fragments and Jimi Hendrix’s Black Widow electric guitar.

Historical instruments featured in Rediscover Treasures include:

• Hochbrucker pedal harp, Germany, c. 1720.

The ingenious design of Jacob Hochbrucker’s pedal harp represents a revolutionary step in the history of the harp. Single-action pedal harps would become one of the most popular instruments in the mid-18th century, especially among the French aristocracy, including Marie Antoinette. Today, only four known original Hochbrucker pedal harps remain.

• Hitoyogiri of Emperor Go-Daigo, Japan, early 14th century.

This extraordinary Japanese instrument is one of two known extant hitoyogiri flutes owned and cherished by Japanese Emperor Go-Daigo (1288-1339). The body is profusely decorated with multiple layers of lacquer and gold powder and features elaborate dragon and cloud designs.

Loan courtesy of the Takao Oikawa family

• Crystal flute by Claude Laurent, France, 1809.

A watchmaker and mechanic by trade, Laurent was a musician at heart, which led him to develop innovative glass flutes in 1806. Insensitive to temperature and humidity, these revolutionary “crystal flutes” were stable, homogeneous and well-tuned instruments.

• “The First Ukulele”, Hawaii, c. 1879.

Probably made by Portuguese immigrant Jose do Espirito Santo, this instrument is considered the first Hawaiian-made ukulele. Despite its delicate construction and small size, this ukulele remains in playable condition and produces remarkable volume.

Loan courtesy of Shawn Yacavone at Ukulele Friend

Rediscover Treasures will also include iconic celebrity-owned instruments, including:

• Prince’s purple Yamaha grand piano.

This purple Yamaha grand piano with the word “magnificent” written in metallic gold was used on Prince’s Jam of the Year tour from 1997 to 1998 following the release of his triple album Emancipation. The artist danced to the piano during live performances, as seen in the “Somebody’s Somebody” music video.

Prince’s green stage wardrobe is also on display in the same music video, along with a custom Lākland ‘Black Power’ bass. Bassist Rhonda Smith commissioned this instrument and gifted it to Prince in the late 90s.

Loans courtesy of The Estate of Prince Rogers Nelson and Paisley Park

• “Brownie”, Eric Clapton’s 1956 Fender Stratocaster.

This two-tone sunburst electric guitar was Clapton’s first Strat, and it became a key part of the guitarist’s signature sound. Purchased by Clapton from a London music store in 1967, the guitar can be heard on Clapton’s early solo classics, such as “Layla” and “Bell Bottom Blues”.

Courtesy of Museum of Pop Culture, Seattle, WA

• Gibson Flying V electric guitar from 1958.

Created to rival popular guitars like the Fender Stratocaster, the modernist Flying V was initially so controversial that only 81 examples were shipped in 1958, making originals incredibly rare. This particular Flying V has been played by many world class guitarists including Joe Bonamassa, Eric Johnson and Jack Pearson.

Anonymous loan

• Lionel Hampton’s Deagan vibraphone, c. 1935.

This one-of-a-kind gold “King George” model vibraphone was custom built for Lionel Hampton and remains the only example built to the Deagan company’s most luxurious trim level. Known as the “King of the Vibes”, Hampton played on recordings by Louis Armstrong and others, and he effectively introduced the vibraphone to jazz music.

• Trumpet of Dizzy Gillespie’s Martin Committee.

Considered one of the most iconic trumpeters of all time, Gillespie played an equally iconic trumpet with a distinctive slanted bell. The trumpet on display is one of Gillespie’s personal instruments; Built in 1962, it features gold plating, custom engraving and its signature sterling silver reversed bell.

Loan courtesy of Joey DeFrancesco

Throughout the exhibition, original video content unveils the stories of these instruments and the traditions they represent with performances and interviews with notable museum curators and musicians.

For more information on MIM’s ongoing special exhibit, visit MIM.org.

MIM,

Musical Instrument Museum,

Prince,

Eric Clapton,

Jimi Hendrix,

tools,

music,

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Lizzo trademarks musical instrument after using James Madison’s prized possession https://michaeldorf.org/lizzo-trademarks-musical-instrument-after-using-james-madisons-prized-possession/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 18:14:54 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/lizzo-trademarks-musical-instrument-after-using-james-madisons-prized-possession/ It’s high time Lizzo put a mark on her own flute, Sasha! Along with her sexy, voluptuous body, banging voice, and witty comebacks, Lizzo is also known for being a damn good flautist. That’s why she’s already filed trademark applications for her own flute, “Sasha Flute.” Trademark attorney Michael E. Kondoudis said everybody on Twitter […]]]>

It’s high time Lizzo put a mark on her own flute, Sasha!

Along with her sexy, voluptuous body, banging voice, and witty comebacks, Lizzo is also known for being a damn good flautist. That’s why she’s already filed trademark applications for her own flute, “Sasha Flute.”

Trademark attorney Michael E. Kondoudis said everybody on Twitter the details of Lizzo’s big move to drop her signature flute.

The ‘Truth Hurts’ hitmaker has filed a trademark for NFTs and NFT-supported media; children’s books and toys; NFT marketplaces for virtual goods, television and film productions, entertainment services, virtual clothing and apparel, and online virtual environments, including virtual goods retail stores.

Per Billboard, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has received Lizzo’s seven flute trademark applications. Attorney Peter Nussbaum filed the claims on the popstar’s behalf last week.

Interestingly, Lizzo’s Sasha Flute has her own Instagram account, garnering over 326,000 followers. Based on her profile pictures, Sasha Flute has appeared and has been used by her owner, Lizzo, on numerous occasions, including during her performances.

Lizzo does not hide her greatness in playing the flute. Whenever he could show his talent to the public and prove that she was a classically trained flautist, she would, accentuating her innate musical abilities.

READ ALSO: Lizzo made massive music history that no other artist has made: “I’m Afraid!”

Speaking of performing with a flute, Lizzo recently made history after using founding father James Madison’s 200-year-old crystal flute to perform in front of large audiences during her “Special Tour” in Washington DC on September 27. last.

A few days before the concert, the Library of Congress teased the rapper on their collection of flutes, including James Madison’s Crystal Flute from 1813.

To her surprise, the Library of Congress actually granted Lizzo’s request to play the instrument, which was historic, as she was the first person to play the instrument since it was in storage.


Eventually, Complex reported that Lizzo was invited to former President Madison’s estate in Montpelier for a tour and a show if she decided to visit.

Lizzo has just started her “Special” tour in the US, but she already opened ticket sales for her fans in the UK and Europe today. For more information, see this website.

READ ALSO: Will Lizzo make history again? The singer invited to do THIS at James Madison’s estate

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Best Place to Pick Up a Landlord Out of Town 2022 | Musical Instrument Museum | Megalopolitan life https://michaeldorf.org/best-place-to-pick-up-a-landlord-out-of-town-2022-musical-instrument-museum-megalopolitan-life/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 14:52:23 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/best-place-to-pick-up-a-landlord-out-of-town-2022-musical-instrument-museum-megalopolitan-life/ Mormon churches dot the landscape of Metro Phoenix, and you can enter and attend services whenever the doors are open. The temples are a little different: there are only three in the valley (Mesa, Gilbert, and Phoenix), and you can only enter if you are a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day […]]]>

Mormon churches dot the landscape of Metro Phoenix, and you can enter and attend services whenever the doors are open. The temples are a little different: there are only three in the valley (Mesa, Gilbert, and Phoenix), and you can only enter if you are a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with a temple recommend. The exception occurs when a temple has yet to be dedicated, or in the case of the Mesa Arizona Temple, rededicated, which is why thousands of non-Mormons have had the rare opportunity to tour the building at the end of last year. The temple, which was completed in 1927, had been closed for renovations since 2018, and before it was rededicated in December 2021, we got to peek inside the place of worship. Modest dress was encouraged for the free tour, and all attendees were required to put disposable slippers over their shoes so as not to soil the immaculate carpets. We walked past the baptismal font, through changing rooms and into rooms dedicated to worship and wedding ceremonies. The smiling volunteers welcomed us, but didn’t try to convert us, and after the tour, we took a few minutes to stroll through the temple’s beautiful public grounds. Given that the last time the temple was open to the public was in 1975, we feel lucky to have been there last year to take a look inside one of the long standing monuments. Phoenix Metro date.

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Lithophone – singing stone, the oldest musical instrument of the ethnic people of the central highlands of Vietnam https://michaeldorf.org/lithophone-singing-stone-the-oldest-musical-instrument-of-the-ethnic-people-of-the-central-highlands-of-vietnam/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/lithophone-singing-stone-the-oldest-musical-instrument-of-the-ethnic-people-of-the-central-highlands-of-vietnam/ Baku, September 29, AZERTAC If the Gobustan State Reserve in Azerbaijan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is famous for its ancient musical instrument called Gavaldash (stone tambourine), the central highlands of Vietnam can boast of its lithophone, which is called “goong lu” in the language of the M’Nong ethnic group. group, meaning “the stone sounds […]]]>

Baku, September 29, AZERTAC

If the Gobustan State Reserve in Azerbaijan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is famous for its ancient musical instrument called Gavaldash (stone tambourine), the central highlands of Vietnam can boast of its lithophone, which is called “goong lu” in the language of the M’Nong ethnic group. group, meaning “the stone sounds like a gong”.

Producing a sound similar to the Gavaldash of Gobustan, the lithophone is the oldest musical instrument of the ethnic people of the central highlands of Vietnam.

While Gobustan’s Gavaldash Reserve found at Jingirdagh is shaped like two large pillow-shaped stones on a hill slope, with the third stone being considerably flatter than the other two below it, Vietnam’s lithophone is made up of stone bars of different length and thickness.

The longer and wider the bar, the lower the sound. The shorter, smaller and thinner the bar, the higher the sound.

In 2005, the lithophone was classified by UNESCO as a musical instrument in the highlands space of the center of gong culture.

In Vietnam, the first lithophone set was discovered by French ethnologist Georges Condominas in 1949 at N’dut Lieng Krat, a village of the M’Nong Gar people in Krong No commune, Lak district, Dak Lak province.

This approximately 3000 year old lithophone is now on display at the Musée de l’Homme in Paris, France.

In Dak Nong, two lithophones were found in 1993 and 2014 respectively. At present, the two lithophones are kept and exhibited in Dak Nong Museum.

The first lithophone was discovered at Dak Kar stream in Quang Tin commune, Dak R’Lap district, Dak Nong province and named Dak Kar lithophone. According to the results of the research of scientists, it is about 2500 years old, made from cordierite.

Through milling and processing, prehistoric men created a complete lithophone consisting of 3 bars: the T’ru (father) bar, the T’ro (mother) bar and the Te (child) bar.

The second lithophone was discovered in 2014 in Dak Son village, Nam Xuan commune, Krong No district, Dak Nong province and was named Dak Son lithophone.

The Dak Son lithophone consists of 16 bars, of which 11 bars were intact, 5 bars were broken into two or more sections but could be patched back to the original shape.

Based on the manufacturing technique, sound frequency and arrangement into sets of instruments through the sound frequency of music science, the scientist confirmed that the Dak Son lithophone is from the tradition of N’ Dut Lieng Krak, a collection of ancient lithophones dating back around 3,000 years. from.

For the M’Nong of the Dak Nong UNESCO Global Geopark, the lithophone shows the harmony and conquest of man with nature.

As the famous Gavaldash of Azerbaijan, this instrument was also played in dancing and singing ceremonies, as well as in festivals such as Yang Worship, New Rice Ceremony, etc.

Ancient people believed that the sound of the lithophone was a way to connect human beings to heaven and earth, to connect the past to the present, and to lead people towards a prosperous future.

AZERTAG.AZ :Lithophone – singing stone, the oldest musical instrument of the ethnic people of the central highlands of Vietnam

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Your weekend: Take your musical instrument for a kitchen party in Port Moody https://michaeldorf.org/your-weekend-take-your-musical-instrument-for-a-kitchen-party-in-port-moody/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 03:13:08 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/your-weekend-take-your-musical-instrument-for-a-kitchen-party-in-port-moody/ Weekend events in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody September 23-25, 2022. Friday September 23 PRO-D FILM Families with young children in School District 43 schools participating in Pro-D Day can visit the Nancy Bennett Room at the Poirier Branch of the Coquitlam Public Library (575 Poirier Street, Coquitlam) or the downtown branch (1169 Pinetree […]]]>

Weekend events in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody September 23-25, 2022.

Friday September 23

PRO-D FILM

Families with young children in School District 43 schools participating in Pro-D Day can visit the Nancy Bennett Room at the Poirier Branch of the Coquitlam Public Library (575 Poirier Street, Coquitlam) or the downtown branch (1169 Pinetree Way) for a screening of Dreamworks’ The villains, with the voices of Sam Rockwell, Awkwafina and Zazie Beetz. The film runs from 1:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. No registration is required.

MORE: coqlibrary.ca

AT THE PALACE

Put on your Coquitlam Express jersey and cheer on the hockey players as they take on Prince George at the Poirier Sports and Recreation Complex (633 Poirier Street, Coquitlam). The puck drops at 7 p.m.

MORE: coquitlamexpress.ca

COFFEE

Hear musician-songwriter Lowry Olafson perform at the Crossroads Coffeehouse, a fundraiser for the Crossroads Hospice Society. Doors open at 7 p.m. with an open mic at 7:30 p.m. Olafson takes the stage at 8:50 p.m. in Leigh Square (next to Port Coquitlam City Hall).

MORE: thecrossroadscoffeehouse.com

Saturday September 24

VACATION-LOFT

Go on a scavenger hunt at Coquitlam’s citywide garage sale, which runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today and Sunday. The address list of participating households will be available online.

MORE: coquitlam.ca

50 YEARS YOUNG

Join Place des Arts (1120 Brunette Avenue, Coquitlam) during the day as it begins to mark its 50th anniversary with a community art project. The project will be animated by an artist from the faculty and will represent the impact of the Maillardville hall on the community. The final artwork will be unveiled in June 2023. You can also participate on September 27 from 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

MORE: www.placedesarts.ca

KITCHEN PARTY

Join former Haligonian and Port Moody resident Adam Faber for a kitchen party in the park, taking place from noon to 2 p.m. at Rocky Point Park (2800 block of Murray Street, Port Moody). Bring an acoustic instrument to the open jam in the picnic shelters or grab a shaker or cabasa from the box. All levels of musical skill are welcome. The event is funded in part by Neighborhood Small Grants.

AFTER: squeezerocks.ca

PAPER GAME

Make and decorate paper dolls and no-sew rag dolls from around the world at the Mackin House Museum (1116 Brunette Avenue, Coquitlam) from noon to 3 p.m. This free event is part of Culture Days celebrations across Canada.

RSVP: events@coquitlamheritage.ca

BOARD GAME

Meet at the Nancy Bennett Room at the Poirier Branch of the Coquitlam Public Library (575 Poirier Street, Coquitlam) for a day of board games. From 1 to 3 p.m., families with children seven and older can join in the fun.

MORE: coqlibrary.ca

FAMILY DAYS

Family Days returns to Evergreen’s Art Gallery (1205 Pinetree Way, Coquitlam). Visit an outdoor installation by Krystle Silverfox to be inspired by an arts and crafts using transparent papers, beads and other objects. The event is free; however, registration is required. Parents must stay with their children during the program, which runs from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.; a second session is from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

MORE: evergreenculturalcentre.ca

WINNERS SHOW

See and hear the winners of the inaugural Dare to Shine contest hosted by Tri-City resident and musician Susie McGregor. Ea Ritchie, 14, Annika Trask, 18, Willem Roelents, 25, and Judy Johnson, 58, will take the stage at the Evergreen Cultural Center at 7:30 p.m.

MORE: evergreenculturalcentre.ca

Sunday September 25

FARMERS’ FIELDS

Shop for local food from farmers and vendors in Metro Vancouver at the Coquitlam Farmers Market, which runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the parking lot next to the Dogwood Pavilion (1655 Winslow Ave., Coquitlam).

MORE: makebakegrow.com

LIONS PARK ART

Port Coquitlam Artist-in-Residence Kaitlyn Beugh ends her tenure with a studio at Lions Park (2300 Lions Way, Port Coquitlam). From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., take part in his Drawing with the Rain Garden session, a recorded meeting that allows participants to color and be inspired by nature (class #68471).

REGISTER: portcoquitlam.ca/register

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The musical instrument industry is having its busiest season ever https://michaeldorf.org/the-musical-instrument-industry-is-having-its-busiest-season-ever/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:46:33 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/the-musical-instrument-industry-is-having-its-busiest-season-ever/ For Avery McDaniel, back to school is the busiest time of year for his musical instrument repair and rental shop in Beloit, Wisconsin. McDaniel Music Repair’s instrument rental and repair business for school bands “literally pays the payroll and major bills.” The past few years have been difficult for McDaniel. In 2019, he reduced his […]]]>

For Avery McDaniel, back to school is the busiest time of year for his musical instrument repair and rental shop in Beloit, Wisconsin.

McDaniel Music Repair’s instrument rental and repair business for school bands “literally pays the payroll and major bills.”

The past few years have been difficult for McDaniel. In 2019, he reduced his shop. And when the pandemic started, schools didn’t need instruments or repairs. But while people stayed home, they dusted off their old instruments in the attic, and McDaniel and his team turned to repairing instruments like guitars and ukuleles for individuals.

Now that in-person lessons have resumed, McDaniel’s shop is back to repair instruments over the summer, getting them ready for the new school year. But this year the repairs are more complex and McDaniel had to extend the turnaround time from a few days to about a month. And the rental season is the busiest ever. McDaniel has run out of instruments to rent, especially clarinets. Year-over-year, clarinet rentals are up 40%, McDaniel said.

“It’s one of those things that we keep telling ourselves is, ‘That’s a good problem to have,'” McDaniel said. “That doesn’t make it any less of a problem.”

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How to dispose of an old musical instrument that you no longer use https://michaeldorf.org/how-to-dispose-of-an-old-musical-instrument-that-you-no-longer-use/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 13:14:38 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/how-to-dispose-of-an-old-musical-instrument-that-you-no-longer-use/ Do you have an old musical instrument lying around at home that you no longer use? Don’t know how to get rid of it? Do not worry; We are here to help you ! This blog post will discuss the best ways to dispose of an old musical instrument. We will also give you advice […]]]>

Do you have an old musical instrument lying around at home that you no longer use? Don’t know how to get rid of it? Do not worry; We are here to help you ! This blog post will discuss the best ways to dispose of an old musical instrument. We will also give you advice on how to give away or sell your instrument. So whether you’re a musician updating your gear or someone who’s inherited an old instrument that they don’t know what to do with, read on for some helpful tips!

Sell ​​your instrument

One of the best ways to get rid of your old musical instrument is to sell it. This is a great option if your instrument is still in good shape and you think someone else might benefit from it. You can use it in different ways to sell your instrument. For example, you can sell your guitar to a pawn shop and make money from it. If you want to get the highest possible price for your instrument, you can sell it online through classified ads or auction sites such as eBay. You can also hold a garage sale and include your old musical instrument.

When selling your musical equipment, it is important to be honest about the condition of the item. Be sure to mention any damage or wear as this will affect the price you can sell it for. It’s also a good idea to take pictures of your instrument so that potential buyers can see what they’re getting. If possible, let the buyer see the item in person before making a purchase. That way they can inspect the instrument and make sure it’s in the condition you said it was.

Donate your instrument

If you don’t want to sell your old musical instrument, another option is to donate it. It’s a great way to get rid of an unwanted instrument and help a good cause. There are many places that accept musical instrument donations, such as schools, music programs, and charities. Be sure to research locations carefully to ensure your instrument will go to a good home.

When donating your instrument, it is important to know if the organization accepts instruments in your state. Some organizations may only accept instruments in excellent condition, while others may be able to repair or refurbish an instrument before putting it into service. It’s also a good idea to get a receipt for your donation. This way you can claim the donation as a tax deduction (if eligible).

Throw away your instrument

Sometimes the best way to get rid of an old musical instrument is to throw it away. This is usually only an option if the instrument is damaged beyond repair or too old to be worth anything. If you decide to throw away your instrument, be sure to check with your local waste management center first. Some facilities may have special regulations for disposal of musical instruments.

When disposing of an old musical instrument, it is important to take certain safety precautions. For example, if the instrument has any metal parts, you will want to remove them before putting them in the trash. Indeed, the metal can rust and contaminate other materials with which it comes into contact. You should also put the instrument in a double bag to prevent sharp edges from entering the bag and hurting someone.

Get them assessed

Before you dispose of your old musical instrument, you may want to have it appraised. This is especially true if the instrument is valuable or has sentimental value. An estimate will give you an accurate estimate of the value of your instrument. It can help you decide whether to sell, give away, or throw away your instrument.

When you get your instrument appraised, be sure to use a reputable source. There are plenty of scams out there, so you’ll want to make sure you get an accurate assessment. Once you have the assessment, be sure to keep it in a safe place. That way you’ll have it handy if you need to consult it again.

Organize a garage sale

You can always hold a garage sale if you want to get rid of your old musical instrument but don’t want to sell it online or donate it. It’s a great way to declutter and sell unwanted items in your home, including musical instruments you no longer use.

When hosting a garage sale, be sure to price your items accordingly. This includes considering the condition of the item and its value. It’s also a good idea to advertise your garage sale in advance so people know when and where it’s happening. Finally, make sure you have plenty of change on hand so you can make sales.

There are many ways to dispose of an old musical instrument that you no longer use. You can sell, give away, throw away or hold a garage sale. The best option for you will depend on the condition of the instrument and what you want to do with it. Whichever option you choose, be sure to take some safety precautions and do your research beforehand.

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Pope calls on traditional Kazakh musical instrument to talk about mission of peace https://michaeldorf.org/pope-calls-on-traditional-kazakh-musical-instrument-to-talk-about-mission-of-peace/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/pope-calls-on-traditional-kazakh-musical-instrument-to-talk-about-mission-of-peace/ The two strings of the dombra are a call to shape the harmony from two parallel strings. Religious freedom is the “best channel for civil coexistence,” Pope Francis told Kazakh authorities gathered at the Kazakh Nur-Sultan Concert Hall on September 13, 2022. In the presence of Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, he hailed the “healthy secularism” […]]]>

The two strings of the dombra are a call to shape the harmony from two parallel strings.

Religious freedom is the “best channel for civil coexistence,” Pope Francis told Kazakh authorities gathered at the Kazakh Nur-Sultan Concert Hall on September 13, 2022. In the presence of Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, he hailed the “healthy secularism” of this Central Asian country which “recognizes the important and indispensable role of religion and resists the forms of extremism which disfigure it”.

After being received by the Kazakh head of state at the Ak Orda presidential palace, the 85-year-old pontiff went to the large concert hall where political, diplomatic and religious representatives of the country were waiting for him.

The pope thanked the authorities for their invitation to participate in the 7th Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions, an interreligious summit bringing together some 100 spiritual representatives from around the world, which he described as a place to promote harmony and Peace.

I would like to express my appreciation for the affirmation of the value of human life embodied by the abolition of the death penalty in the name of the right to hope of every human being. Along with this, it is important to guarantee freedom of thought, conscience and expression, in order to enable each individual to play their unique and equal role in the service of society as a whole.

FILIPPO MONTEFORTE | AFP

Drawing inspiration from the image of the dombra, a two-stringed instrument characteristic of the region since the Middle Ages, the Pontiff underlined its vocation as a meeting place, born, he said, from the painful memory of the gulags where, in the 20th century, many people were deported en masse by the Soviet authorities.

Kazakhstan is known for its ability to constantly create harmony between “two parallel strings”…

For François, “one hears in this country the ‘notes’ of two souls, Asian and European, which give it a ‘permanent mission to connect two continents’”.

Without mentioning the neighboring countries, especially China and Russia, the Pope considered that this situation as a bridge between East and West destined it to play a fundamental role in mitigating conflicts.

The Supreme Pontiff specifically cited the “senseless and tragic war” caused by the invasion of Ukraine, as well as other ongoing clashes around the world.

Lamenting the effect of these conflicts on developing countries, the Bishop of Rome called for amplifying the cry of those calling for peace, urging leaders to infuse multilateral organizations with “a new spirit of Helsinki” in reference at the 1975 conference.

He insisted on the fact that this commitment is everyone’s responsibility, because “one’s problem is everyone’s problem” and therefore requires a dialogue with everyone.

KAZAKHSTAN

Against nuclear armament

While the question of the risk of nuclear conflict was raised in the context of the war in Ukraine, the Sovereign Pontiff welcomed the choice made by Kazakhstan to renounce nuclear weapons.

Although it had nuclear weapons at the time of its independence in 1991, the country voluntarily chose to dismantle this part of its arsenal, a remnant of the Soviet era.

Pope Francis also praised the Central Asian country’s commitment to “energy and environmental” policies and addressed the energy issue, which is at the heart of this resource-rich nation.

On this point, the Sovereign Pontiff denounced that “integral development is hostage to a generalized injustice, through which resources are unequally distributed”.

He called on the state and the private sector not to limit economic development to the gains of the few.

Pope Francis then returned to the Apostolic Nunciature where he will sleep for the two nights of his stay in Nour-Sultan. Tomorrow, he will participate in the VII Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions.

The Supreme Pontiff sometimes gave the impression of being tired after the 6.30 a.m. flight which puts him four hours ahead of Rome. He showed some difficulty getting up and sitting down from his wheelchair.

Patriarch Cyril meets Pope Francis

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