Music performer – Michael Dorf http://michaeldorf.org/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 11:39:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://michaeldorf.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/default1.png Music performer – Michael Dorf http://michaeldorf.org/ 32 32 The Blue Man Group’s Starlight Show Is An Artist’s Homecoming https://michaeldorf.org/the-blue-man-groups-starlight-show-is-an-artists-homecoming/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 23:37:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/the-blue-man-groups-starlight-show-is-an-artists-homecoming/ As Blue Man Group takes the stage at Starlight this weekend, it’s a homecoming for an artist. KMBC 9 caught up with him to take a look behind the scenes of the show and find out what he says are the best and hardest parts. Before becoming a Blue Man, Steven Wendt had a lot […]]]>

As Blue Man Group takes the stage at Starlight this weekend, it’s a homecoming for an artist. KMBC 9 caught up with him to take a look behind the scenes of the show and find out what he says are the best and hardest parts. Before becoming a Blue Man, Steven Wendt had a lot to learn. “I had never seen it when I auditioned, I really had no idea,” he said as he stood backstage at the Starlight Theater ahead of opening night From the drums to lesser-known instruments like the Galaxy Maker and the PVC Pipe Drum Bone, the Johnson County native has mastered them all after 10 years of touring Wendt, who went to Shawnee Mission North High School, is thrilled to bring music and laughter back to its hometown, with never-before-seen surprises in store “Blue Man Group is constantly revising, coming up with new content, and this show is 80% new,” Wendt said, ” so if you’ve seen Blue Man Group before, that’s totally different.” He says his favorite part is the interaction with the audience, but that also brings one of the biggest challenges. “I guess not not laughing would probably be the hardest part, because we find ourselves in funny situations es,” he said, “and as long as we can stick together, the audience can laugh for us. He can’t wait to earn those laughs at Starlight all weekend. Blue Man The band performs at Starlight at 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday. To get tickets, click here.

As Blue Man Group takes the stage at Starlight this weekend, it’s a homecoming for an artist. KMBC 9 caught up with him to get a behind-the-scenes look at the show and find out what he says are the best and hardest parts.

Before becoming a Blue Man, Steven Wendt had a lot to learn.

“I had never seen it when I auditioned, I really had no idea,” he said as he stood backstage at the Starlight Theater ahead of opening night.

From drums to lesser-known instruments like the galaxy maker and the drum bone made from PVC pipe, the Johnson County native has mastered them all after 10 years of touring.

Wendt, who went to Shawnee Mission North High School, is excited to bring music and laughter back to his hometown, with never-before-seen surprises in store.

“Blue Man Group is constantly revising, coming up with new content and this show is 80% new,” Wendt said, “so if you’ve seen Blue Man Group before, that’s totally different.”

He says his favorite part is interacting with the audience, but that also brings one of the biggest challenges.

“I guess not laughing would probably be the hardest part, because we end up in funny situations,” he said, “and as long as we can stick together, the audience can laugh for us.”

He can’t wait to earn those laughs at Starlight all weekend.

Blue Man Group performs at Starlight at 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday. To get tickets, click here.

]]>
HR Pro shares warning sign https://michaeldorf.org/hr-pro-shares-warning-sign/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:38:27 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/hr-pro-shares-warning-sign/ Internet commentators were quick to agree with an HR professional who shared a surefire warning sign that a high-level employee is about to quit. In a viral video posted on June 21, TikTok user @peopleculturecollective stages a conversation between herself and a business leader in which a key employee is asked about her recent job […]]]>

Internet commentators were quick to agree with an HR professional who shared a surefire warning sign that a high-level employee is about to quit.

In a viral video posted on June 21, TikTok user @peopleculturecollective stages a conversation between herself and a business leader in which a key employee is asked about her recent job performance.

With fast-paced music playing in the background, a text overlay reading “Manager explaining how his team’s top performer seems completely disengaged and taking longer than usual,” precedes an abrupt cut.

As the background music shifts from high-energy and jovial to slow and sinister, @peopleculturecollective plays a concerned HR professional and hints that the “top performer” will be leaving the company soon.

Captioned “This is NOT a good sign”, the TikTok has racked up over 900,000 views and been liked over 70,000 times.

For more than a year, employees in the United States have left their jobs at higher rates than at any other time in the country’s history.

Although the Great Quit — a phenomenon of mass quits that has swept the nation’s workforce away from old employers and into the arms of new ones — began last April, data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS ) show that the last few months have been the most dramatic.

From October 2021 to April 2022, more than 4 million American employees quit their jobs every month.

In November 2021, resignations peaked at 4.5 million. In April 2022, the most recent month for which the BLS reported separations data, quits declined slightly but remained high at 4.4 million.

Fast-food franchises and department stores have been the most vocal about labor shortages and a generation of potential employees who “don’t want to work anymore,” and corporate offices are facing similar problems. But instead of a revolving door of marginal employees, top performers are leaving their employers in droves.

Whereas fast business reported that neural plasticity and the need for evolutionary stimulation drive valuable employees to seek out different opportunities with greater responsibility, Forbes reports that many top performers leave their jobs due to poor management and inconsistencies.

“It is even more important to focus on the development of your managers, because they are the ones who have a direct impact on the happiness and performance of your best employees”, Forbes says contributor Aaron Levy. “If you don’t go upstream and fix the root of the problem, no amount of free lunches or ping-pong tournaments will help you.”

TikTok users have flocked to a viral video after an HR professional shared a surefire sign that an employee is preparing to quit.
fizkes/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Throughout the comments section of the viral video posted by @peopleculturecollective, many TikTok users echoed this sentiment and accused employers of not understanding how to cultivate high performing employees while keeping them happy. and committed in the short and long term.

“Never take the best for granted,” wrote one commenter in a comment that has been liked nearly 8,000 times. “They’re not on top because they like hard work. They’re ambitious and you have to keep them engaged.”

“Consider quitting my job because they [refuse] to *hire adequately* and just tell us to take over,” another commenter added, receiving over 9,000 likes.

In a separate comment, which has been liked nearly 3,500 times, another TikTok user wondered how employers hadn’t yet realized they were to blame for their top performers leaving. .

“When will companies realize that exploiting + burning out top performers = exit strategy?” they asked.

Newsweek contacted @peopleculturecollective for comment.

]]>
Devon performer Luke Friend joins Footloose cast for Torquay show https://michaeldorf.org/devon-performer-luke-friend-joins-footloose-cast-for-torquay-show/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 10:01:26 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/devon-performer-luke-friend-joins-footloose-cast-for-torquay-show/ Singer Luke Friend, who grew up in Devon, joins the cast of Footloose the Musical for their show at Torquay’s Princess Theater in August. Luke, who rose to fame after finishing third in the 10th series of The X Factor in 2013, will play the role of Willard. The critically acclaimed tour kicked off in […]]]>

Singer Luke Friend, who grew up in Devon, joins the cast of Footloose the Musical for their show at Torquay’s Princess Theater in August. Luke, who rose to fame after finishing third in the 10th series of The X Factor in 2013, will play the role of Willard.

The critically acclaimed tour kicked off in February and continues to delight audiences across the UK. Luke, who originated the role of Willard in Zurich earlier this year, has received numerous accolades as a musician and has supported The Vamps on several arena tours.

Alongside this, the 26-year-old has been seen on stages across the UK in recent years, playing St. Jimmy’s in the UK and New Zealand on American Idiot’s 10th anniversary tour, appearing in the original cast recordings and workshops of new musicals Summer Survival and Game Theory and featured in LIFT, a musical out of the West End.

Read more:Michael McIntyre adds new Torquay tour date amid massive demand

A huge hit with Torquay audiences during panto season at the Princess, Luke still loves coming home to Devon. Luke said: “I’m extremely excited to be back in the role of Willard and this amazing theater. Footloose is an amazing show, with a fantastic cast – it’s such a fun night in the 80s and the audience always leaves energized. The buzz about this show is contagious and coming home to Devon with this production is such a treat.

“I love the crowds at the Princess Theater and can’t wait to see the people of Torquay get up and go wild! Looking forward to seeing you all there.

Additional cast remains including Darren Day as Reverend Moore with Lucy Munden (Ariel), Oonagh Cox (Rusty), Anna Westlake (Lulu), Alex Fobbester (Bickle), Ben Barrow (Wes), Ben Mabberley (Jeter) , Geri Allen (Ethel), Holly Ashton (Vi), Jess Barker (Wendy-Jo), Joshua Hawkins (Ren), Samantha Richards (Urleen), Tom Mussell (Chuck), and Daniel Miles and Lucy Ireland as offstage swings.

City boy Ren thinks life is bad enough when he’s forced to move to a remote rural part of America. But his world comes to a standstill when he arrives in Bomont to find that dancing and rock music are banned. Taking matters into his own hands, Ren soon has all hell breaking loose and the whole town on its feet.

Based on the 1980s on-screen sensation that took the world by storm, Footloose The Musical is sizzling with wit, fun and some of Britain’s finest musical talent. With cutting-edge modern choreography, you’ll enjoy classic 80s hits including Holding Out for a Hero, Almost Paradise, Let’s Hear It For The Boy and, of course, the unforgettable title track Footloose.

Footloose the Musical takes place at the Princess Theater from Tuesday, August 9 through Saturday, August 13. Tickets, from £13, can be purchased here.

]]>
Keep Moving – CBS Baltimore https://michaeldorf.org/keep-moving-cbs-baltimore/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 22:02:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/keep-moving-cbs-baltimore/ BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Gospel singer Le’Andria Johnson sings about the blessings of life and tries to reach people who don’t know how to digest their emotions in the face of life’s difficulties. She spoke to WJZ’s Ava-Joye Burnett about her music and ministry. WJZ is the official TV partner of AFRAM, which started at Druid […]]]>

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Gospel singer Le’Andria Johnson sings about the blessings of life and tries to reach people who don’t know how to digest their emotions in the face of life’s difficulties.

She spoke to WJZ’s Ava-Joye Burnett about her music and ministry. WJZ is the official TV partner of AFRAM, which started at Druid Hill Park.

READ MORE: Travelers see flight cancellations, prepare for problems with summer travel

The two-day festival celebrating African-American culture coincides with Juneteenth, the commemoration of the emancipation of enslaved African-Americans in 1865 that officially became a federal holiday last year.

The Better Days song is self-explanatory, Johnson told Burnett.

“Better days are coming and I’m grateful to be able to share this across the world,” she said. As for Deliver Me, the song is “a personal cry,” she said.

“You have people dealing with a lot of things that don’t know how to express that,” Johnson said. “They don’t know who to go to or who to talk to, but that song is there. . . . A lot of things we get into—WE get into—so we have to deal with the aftermath. But if we start to recognize that it’s us and no one else, it makes the song even sweeter.

READ MORE: Maryland Apple workers face hurdles after voting to unionize

Johnson touched the hand of some of his fans. She said it was to let them know she appreciates them and is human too.

“I’m flesh and blood like them and I’m going to show you how flesh and blood I am,” she said. “I’m going to go out there and relate to people. I will touch your hand. I will hold you. I’ll give you a hug. Hey, here we are. We are all here together. We are the church.

Johnson was emotional during her performance. She said that during times of great struggle, she remembers what her grandmother used to say: keep moving forward.

Johnson described how she used to watch her grandmother keep her cool and make it look like there was nothing wrong.

“That energy was, you know, instilled in me,” she said. “I was able to convey that to the crowd. The crowd gave me their energy and I was there. Everything was great. It got me moving because I wanted to stop crying. I’m not going to lie.

NO MORE NEWS: Two men dead after car overturns near Manchester, Maryland, police say

]]>
Nashville artist to headline Chautauqua | Community https://michaeldorf.org/nashville-artist-to-headline-chautauqua-community/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 13:52:00 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/nashville-artist-to-headline-chautauqua-community/ According to staff reports The Chautauqua Festival will wrap up June 25 with a performance by Nashville singer-songwriter Allie Colleen. “One of the things the arts council prides itself on is trying to find promising artists for the festival, such as Chris Stapleton, Mickey Guyton and many others,” said Matthew Frusher, chairman of the Wythe […]]]>

According to staff reports

The Chautauqua Festival will wrap up June 25 with a performance by Nashville singer-songwriter Allie Colleen.

“One of the things the arts council prides itself on is trying to find promising artists for the festival, such as Chris Stapleton, Mickey Guyton and many others,” said Matthew Frusher, chairman of the Wythe Arts Council. , which organizes the festival. “We think Allie won’t disappoint. We’re thrilled to have her wrap up our first full festival in two years.

A graduate of Belmont University in Owasso, Oklahoma, Allie grew up around music and is no stranger to the industry. Passionate about singing and songwriting from a young age, she earned a reputation as a remarkable songwriter with a strong American voice, singing about the layers of love and heartbreak that shaped her. She cited country singers Jo Dee Messina and Martina McBryde as influences.

Some of his songs are witty; others are serious. One of his original songs, “Close Enough”, has over 750,000 views on YouTube. Her social following is growing every year.

People also read…

Her song ‘Ain’t the Only Hell (My Momma Raised) earned a Top 40 spot in 2020. She released her debut album, ‘Stones’ late last year and her latest single, ‘Halo and Horns” in May.

Her passionate drive and innovative vision set her apart from her peers, resulting in music and videos going viral on the internet – even catching the attention of famed radio show host Bobby Bones – a sign that her audience is captive and waiting for his next song. .

Constantly working to hone her skills alongside industry professionals and performing at venues in Nashville and across the country, Allie Colleen has garnered a growing fan base. Her debut single, “Work In Progress,” defines the life that shaped her with personal lyrics and transparency in both vocals and delivery.

Of Allie, People magazine said: “The tattooed Oklahoma-born singer has long found herself in a tussle with her own soul, trying to figure out who she is deep down inside and what his music should represent and why that old ‘every blessing is a curse’ seems to ring so true in his life.

She told the magazine that people often threw rocks at her.

“Anyone with any public profile knows what I mean,” she told People in May. “The stones can come from any angle. And some days you just want to pick them up and throw them back as hard as you can… But I just try to keep them in my pocket. What about those that are too heavy? Well, I just leave those where they are.”

]]>
Jazz singer Tessa Souter a performer at the Rochester International Jazz Festival https://michaeldorf.org/jazz-singer-tessa-souter-a-performer-at-the-rochester-international-jazz-festival/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:17:59 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/jazz-singer-tessa-souter-a-performer-at-the-rochester-international-jazz-festival/ As a child, Tessa Souter had few answers as to why she had dark skin, a trait that separated her from many of her British friends. “I used to put lemons on my skin to try and make me whiter because I wanted to blend in with my friends when I was really young,” Souter […]]]>

As a child, Tessa Souter had few answers as to why she had dark skin, a trait that separated her from many of her British friends.

“I used to put lemons on my skin to try and make me whiter because I wanted to blend in with my friends when I was really young,” Souter said.

It will be years before the jazz singer learns the truth, a very different story from what her mother told her – a claim that her father was a Spaniard who died in a plane crash.

Instead, as Souter discovered, his father was a black man from Trinidad, a revelation to this day that, years after the discovery, still strikes Souter at his emotional heart. Although still sensitive to issues of race and inequality, Souter now had a new focus on the plight of black people, especially those in the United States, where she now lives and where the ugly legacy of slavery still reverberates. .

]]>
Performer Talya Groves sings KC on Broadway and back again https://michaeldorf.org/performer-talya-groves-sings-kc-on-broadway-and-back-again/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:12:55 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/performer-talya-groves-sings-kc-on-broadway-and-back-again/ Talya Groves often performs at the Phoenix. // Courtesy of Talya Groves Born and raised in Kansas City, Talya Groves began to realize at an early age that performing was her passion. Over the years, she traveled and worked professionally as a performer on Broadway in New York City and found herself moving back to […]]]>

Talya Groves often performs at the Phoenix. // Courtesy of Talya Groves

Born and raised in Kansas City, Talya Groves began to realize at an early age that performing was her passion.

Over the years, she traveled and worked professionally as a performer on Broadway in New York City and found herself moving back to KC when COVID hit. Now settled, she is rediscovering Kansas City not only as her home but also as a hub for her career.

We sat down with Groves to learn more about her experience living in New York, performing professionally, and returning to the Midwest when she least expected it.


The pitch: Did you always want to be a performer or was there another path you could have seen yourself taking?

Talya Groves: It was always that. I grew up here in Kansas City, and I laughed before I felt all the mothers put their daughters to dance class. For some people it doesn’t last, and it’s just like a fun thing.

It was just like my safe space, and that was what turned me on the most. I I went to a competitive dance school, so once I started competing and had more opportunities to be on stage, it just clicked. Like, “It makes me happy, and it makes other people happy too.”

How was the transition from Kansas City to New York? Was it easier or harder than expected?

It’s so funny because while it was happening, I didn’t think twice about it. It just felt like something I had to do. Looking back, it was terrifying. I mean, I’ve lived in Kansas City all my life, and what happens in New York is you know, as performers, you don’t do everything for your ego, but there’s a lot of ego involved.

When you came to New York, you might have been the best singer and dancer in your high school, but now you’re in a band where everyone was the best singer and dancer in their high school.

It was a lot of novelty all at once. I was definitely equipped for it, but I think I was just in “go” mode. It’s only now that I look back and think, “Wow, I really just moved across the country.”

Talya 2

Talya performing in Kansas City. // Courtesy of Talya Groves

What was the process of starting work on Broadway like? Was it intimidating to get into the business?

I started doing auditions in my senior year of school because I really wanted to get noticed. I was terrified. I was like, “This is awesome. I came here, and I did this thing in college, it was the safety net for four years, and now I’m in New York. What am I going to do?”

When I started my first show, Motown: The Musical, it was so intimidating. I came to LA, and a lot of the people I was going on the show with were not only twice my age, but had all this experience. I also had this go-getter attitude because I was young and ready to make friends, while some people there were already jaded. It was therefore not the simplest, socially.

But, one really cool thing about my first show being Motown is that it was a whole new community of Blackness for me. It celebrated the music I love the most, but I also got to build community with my peers of color.

What was your favorite Broadway production you worked on?

I loved doing Charlie and the chocolate factory. It was so special to be behind a show and to be part of the original cast. We have to do the casting taping, so I’m on it. Every time I’ve been to Broadway, I’ve embarked on a piece that’s already been done.

It’s so much fun, because it will always be me. For example, the diva who wears the orange tracksuit will always be “Talya’s runway”.

What was it like having to come back to Kansas City?

Even when COVID first hit I really had no intention of returning and waited. I mean, it all kind of closed down in March, and I didn’t come back here until November 2020. I waited, but it eventually got to a point where I was like, ‘I don’t have more money, I can I don’t do that.

I saw that Kansas City opened up a little faster, and I had maintained relationships with great musicians in the city like Walter Bryant.

I knew Walter and I had a musical compatibility, so I called him and Kent Rausch, who’s now my drummer, and said, “Guys, I gotta go back and make some money, so if i can find us the gigs, can we do this thing? »

I don’t think anyone doubted me, but there’s a lot of great live music in Kansas City, so I had to be bold. I just called places and let them know who I was and what I had done.

Were you disappointed to have to step back?

I don’t think I knew what it was going to be. It was just like, “This is what I have to do now,” and I didn’t expect to be able to really support myself here. I play shows three to four times a week, and it’s only now that I realize I’ve done something on my own, and I’m here to stay.

Did getting back to acting locally feel any different to being on Broadway? Who are your favorite artists?

I find it a little more rewarding, I think, because it’s more personal. The fact that during my breaks at the Phoenix, or elsewhere, I can go talk to everyone, learn their names, see their faces and see that I am making a difference. Even if it’s just for these four hours that they came to have a good time, it’s so special.

In terms of artists, I really try to present myself as a human jukebox because I know that when I go to listen to live music, I prefer to hear a lot of different things. I’m also excited about any song that gets the audience excited, because then it feels like we’re working together.

I really like Tina Turner, because I think she really put everything she had into her music, and that’s how I try to be. So when I get to his stuff, that’s probably what feels most personal to me.


You can find Talya performing at Phoenix, Johnnie’s Jazz, Stock Hill Steakhouse, and more. Visit his website here.

]]>
Performer of the week: Julia Roberts https://michaeldorf.org/performer-of-the-week-julia-roberts/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 14:00:54 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/performer-of-the-week-julia-roberts/ THE ARTIST | julia robert THE SHOW | Starz’ Gas lighting More from TVLine THE EPISODE | “Year of the Rat” (June 5, 2022) THE PERFORMANCE | We all know now that Martha was right about Nixon’s shady business on Watergate, but it wasn’t until the penultimate episode that we saw how much she suffered […]]]>

THE ARTIST | julia robert

THE SHOW | Starz’ Gas lighting

More from TVLine

THE EPISODE |Year of the Rat” (June 5, 2022)

THE PERFORMANCE | We all know now that Martha was right about Nixon’s shady business on Watergate, but it wasn’t until the penultimate episode that we saw how much she suffered for telling the truth. .

Roberts fired on all cylinders, beaming onscreen in a flashback depicting Martha and John Mitchell’s cute encounter. Her effervescence and southern charm were dazzling enough to soften the brashness of the politician who was to become her future beau.

But his display of self-confidence and poise was quickly shaken when we leapfrogged 16 years. As Martha was about to testify about the Watergate shenanigans, her smirk and wit melted as the committee attacked her character, including her former hospitalization and the “acute mental illness” that ran through her family. The actress chickened out at the right time and, in turn, quickly rebuilt herself despite the many daggers thrown at her. After the hearing, she went on a rampage, ransacking the family’s apartment, defacing her husband’s portrait and screaming in frustration. It was unfair treatment and Roberts forced us to feel the pain of his character.

But when John got home, the sparks really started to fly. “You cheat on me!” she was seething with intoxication. “You gave them the knife and told them exactly where to stick it!” Martha then went on a vicious rant against John, shooting down his crimes and his pseudo relationship with Nixon. Punches were thrown and drinks were crushed as she continued to spew (and mouth) fiery insults at a man she had grown to hate. With tears in her eyes, a quivering lip, and a manic physique, Roberts fully committed to the drama and never once lifted her foot. On the contrary, she reveled in emotional extremes. And when John admitted to being responsible for his traumatic imprisonment in California, the actress didn’t need to say another word. His eyes spoke volumes.

The Colin Firth Staircase Michael Peterson

The Colin Firth Staircase Michael Peterson

HONORABLE MENTION

| We still don’t know what we think of The staircase‘s accused killer Michael Peterson, but we’re sure Colin Firth absolutely wowed us with a masterfully layered and complex performance. In this week’s finale, Firth showed us all the many sides of Michael: he could be an intellectual charmer, as he wooed his wife Kathleen at a posh holiday party, but he could also be vicious, as he ripped her daughter Margie hard at a post-trial celebration dinner. Michael himself was a performer, adapting his personality to his situation, and Firth deftly juggled his myriad characters, the finishing touch being that last enigmatic smile Michael gave the camera. The Oscar winner seemed an unlikely choice for the role at first, but he won us over with a stunning transformation that inhabited the dramatically fertile ground between hero and villain.

For All Humanity Shantel VanSanten

For All Humanity Shantel VanSanten

HONORABLE MENTION

| It only took a few seconds for Shantel VanSanten to impress us during For all mankindSeason 3 premiere. As her character, Karen, silently watched Danny and his bride share their first wedding dance, VanSanten added a wealth of emotion to Karen’s reaction to Danny’s song choice. The cover of “Don’t Be Cruel” played a pivotal role in Karen and Danny’s own story last season, so upon hearing the melody again, Karen’s face sparkled with everything from shock to confusion and maybe even pain. VanSanten deftly navigated Karen’s complex feelings, while trying to put on a nonchalant facade in front of the wedding guests. No one else may have picked up Karen’s emotional response, but we definitely noticed VanSanten’s stellar performance.

Aurora Legacy

Aurora Legacy

HONORABLE MENTION

| Both refreshing and unexpected, one of the strengths of LegacyThe final season was Aurora’s gradual redemption of Rebecca Breeds, a character first introduced to her parent series in 2015. Previously seen as a despised “crazy” woman, Aurora has become much more complex when examined in the proper light, and Breeds’ consistently nuanced performances played a big part in fans falling in love with someone they once reviled. Breeds’ work in Thursday’s penultimate episode was the culmination of all the hard work she’s put in so far, which made it much harder to say goodbye to her the second time around.

Which performance(s) hit your socks this week? Tell us in the comments!

The best of TVLine

Get more from TVLine.com: Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Newsletter

Click here to read the full article.

]]>
Spotlight on the performer of Art Moves: blues musician Murray Porter https://michaeldorf.org/spotlight-on-the-performer-of-art-moves-blues-musician-murray-porter/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 01:01:50 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/spotlight-on-the-performer-of-art-moves-blues-musician-murray-porter/ “The thrill is gone. The thrill is gone. The thrill is gone, baby,” BB King sang in his 1969 rendition of The thrill is gone. All these years, the thrill of singing the blues hasn’t gone away for Murray Porter. He was introduced to the blues over 40 years ago while growing up in southern […]]]>

“The thrill is gone. The thrill is gone. The thrill is gone, baby,” BB King sang in his 1969 rendition of The thrill is gone.

All these years, the thrill of singing the blues hasn’t gone away for Murray Porter. He was introduced to the blues over 40 years ago while growing up in southern Ontario.

“The blues have been my life since I was 14,” says Murray. “I heard BB King sing ‘The Thrill is Gone’ on AM radio late at night. I was hooked. I started playing the blues and have been playing for over 40 years.

Murray’s musical career has taken him all over the world. This month, that brings it to transit.

He is this month’s performer for Art Moves, TransLink’s new series of music and performance residencies that bring added vibrancy to the transit system through the performing arts.

The residency comes at a good time, as June marks National Indigenous History Month, a month to recognize the rich history, heritage, resilience and diversity of First Nations, Inuit and Metis Peoples across Canada.

Murray describes himself as a proud Six Nations Mohawk from the Grand River Territory in southern Ontario. He now lives on unceded Squamish Nation territory in North Vancouver. His new music incorporates many issues facing Indigenous peoples today.

What does National Indigenous History Month mean to you?

It’s a chance for Aboriginal people to share our stories with the general public. This is my chance to share our culture. I am proud to be a First Nations man.

Are there any events during this month that you find particularly meaningful?

The Vancouver Art Gallery memorial with the shoes representing the 215 children whose graves were discovered last year is truly moving.

What was the inspiration for your music?

I use music as a chance to celebrate our Indigenous culture, including the trials and tribulations our people have gone through. Affirmation and Education… asserting our right to be here and educating those who don’t understand this concept. My songs reflect my experience as an Indigenous person, and I have written songs about land and territorial claims, water, missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and residential schools, and will continue to do so. . But I also write and sing songs about love, as well as cheeky satirical songs. I always have a good time and feel so good when I play music, especially in front of an audience.

Video transcript

Hello everyone! My name is Murray Porter, I’m going to play some music for you. Have a little fun! Here we are.

♪ Highway 16 ♪

The blues have been my life since I was 14. I have been playing for 40 years now.

I’m a musician, but I’m first nations first and then a musician. So all these feelings that I have as a First Nation [person] shines through in my music.

♪ When that hawk blows, I’ll be coming home. ♪

As an artist, I think it’s my duty to try to teach people. I sing songs about aboriginal issues like homelessness, poverty, residential schools, [and] murdered and missing women. All of these topics come up in my music because that’s who I am.

]]>
Livingston Parish Library welcomes a didgeridoo performer as part of its summer reading program | Culture & Leisure https://michaeldorf.org/livingston-parish-library-welcomes-a-didgeridoo-performer-as-part-of-its-summer-reading-program-culture-leisure/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 15:08:26 +0000 https://michaeldorf.org/livingston-parish-library-welcomes-a-didgeridoo-performer-as-part-of-its-summer-reading-program-culture-leisure/ Blending music, humor and education – all while paying homage to the earth below – performer Rob Thomas has entertained hundreds of children and adults alike during performances at the Livingston Parish Library. The “Didgeridoo Down Under” performances were part of the library’s “Ocean of Possibilities” summer reading program. The Australia-themed show incorporated science, music, […]]]>

Blending music, humor and education – all while paying homage to the earth below – performer Rob Thomas has entertained hundreds of children and adults alike during performances at the Livingston Parish Library.

The “Didgeridoo Down Under” performances were part of the library’s “Ocean of Possibilities” summer reading program.

The Australia-themed show incorporated science, music, character building, anti-bullying, environmentalism and audience participation. The show had a strong focus on the didgeridoo, a wind instrument in the form of a long wooden tube that is blown to produce a deep, resonant sound, varied by rhythmic accents of timbre and volume.

Thomas, who was born in California and lived in Australia, has been making and playing didgeridoos for almost 30 years. He has performed all over the country and has recorded several CDs. He has also produced music for many films, including the IMAX film “Sacred Planet”.

It performed at all five branches of the Livingston Parish Library on June 1 and 2.

The audience laughed and clapped throughout the show as Thomas played and explained the origins of the didgeridoo, a musical instrument he says was first made by Aboriginal Australians.

Children were also invited to make music with him using sticks and smaller didgeridoos.

]]>